Common Moving Mistakes

Common Moving Mistakes

It’s time to make a move. Whether you’re heading across town or going cross-country, moving yourself or hiring movers, you want an organized, stress-free experience.

What’s the secret to a smooth move? Avoid these common moving mistakes.

 

Mistake #1: Choosing the wrong moving company

There are reputable companies, and there are ones that put out misleading information. There are even plenty of moving scams. Choosing a sketchy moving company not only won’t save you money but it could end up costing you plenty. Know the warning signs. Avoid moving companies that only give phone estimates and/or require large deposits. Skip the ones that only offer non-binding estimates (a quote based on estimated weight of your things). That means they could be planning a much higher bill at the end. Be suspicious of moving companies that have similar names to well-known national brands but are not them. Finally, avoid any mover without an address.

All moving companies that move across state lines must have a DOT number. Ask for it and then look it up in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration database. Make sure their information matches what they told you.

 

Mistake #2: Not getting an estimate in writing

It’s hard for a mover to give you an accurate estimate without seeing your belongings in person. That’s why a mover that only provides a phone estimate is probably not reputable. Insist on a mover who visits your home and gives an estimate in writing. It’s always best to get three estimates. Make sure to read the fine print, and think twice about choosing the lowest bid. If possible, choose a mover that offers a binding not-to-exceed estimate. That means you won’t be charged more than the estimate and may be charged less.

 

Mistake #3: Not giving yourself enough time to pack—and/or not packing boxes correctly

Packing is going to take more time than you think. If you leave it to the last minute, you will be tempted to throw things into boxes without organizing them, which could make unpacking difficult. According to movers.com, it takes 3-5 days full-time to pack a three-bedroom house. If you’re working around a job and other responsibilities, give yourself additional time.

Pack your boxes so they are filled to the top but not overfilled or underfilled. Underfilled boxes can collapse under the weight of others on top of them. You should be able to tape boxes closed so the top is flat. A standard moving box will have a weight limit printed on the bottom. But being able to lift the box is also a consideration. Limit the weight of your boxes to 50 lbs. and you should generally meet the box weight requirements and keep it manageable to lift.

 

Mistake #4: Moving unnecessary items

It may be tempting to bring everything to a new home, and sort it out there. However, moving is a great time to take stock of what you really use and what you don’t. Why spend the time and money moving things that you’ll just end up storing, giving away, or throwing out? Hold a yard sale or donate items before you start packing. This will help lighten the load. Keep track of your donations; you can expense them on your taxes.

 

Mistake #5: Not knowing the obstacles at your new location

Are there narrow roads or restricted access at your new home? Is there no parking for an 18-wheeler? If so, your moving company may need to get a smaller truck and shuttle your stuff—at an extra charge. Also, if your furniture doesn’t fit through the doorways or hallways of your new home, it may need to be disassembled. You’ll be charged for these extra services, so be aware. Note also that many cheap pieces of furniture are made from particleboard. It’s not meant to be moved and is easily broken.

 

Mistake #6: Not preparing for your pets

Your pets are part of the family, but moving day will be particularly stressful for them. After all, they won’t understand why strangers are taking their furniture. With all of the commotion, it’s also easy for a pet to get lost in the shuffle, or have a scared animal run away or hide. Consider having relatives or friends take care of your pets or board them in a kennel for moving day. Also, make sure that you have your pet’s records for easy access when you need them.

 

Mistake #7: Choosing to move your valuables with the moving company

You may not care much if you have to replace the IKEA artwork from your living room, but the picture painted by your grandfather is irreplaceable. Therefore, if it’s sentimental and it can’t be replaced with money, plan to move that valuable item yourself.

 

Mistake #8: Not having enough insurance

Who covers your valuables if your mover drops something and breaks it? Surprisingly, it may not be the moving company. Homeowner’s and renter’s policies cover your personal property while at your home and in storage—but not while they are being transported by movers.

Your moving company should offer insurance, as listed in your contract. Options include: full value protection, released value protection, and separate liability coverage. You’ll pay for full value but will also be reimbursed the full value if anything breaks. For released value protection, you’ll typically get just 60 cents on the dollar per pound (so a 30-lb. flat-screen TV would be an $18 reimbursement).

If you’re moving yourself, you can arrange for trip transit insurance, special perils contents coverage, or a floater for valuables with your insurance company. Protect your possessions so they make it safely to your new home.

 

 

This article is furnished by California Casualty, providing auto and home insurance to educators, law enforcement officers, firefighters, and nurses. Get a quote at 1.866.704.8614 or www.calcas.com.

 

How to Protect the Things You Cherish

protecting valuable posessions Do you know the most popular time to receive jewelry? You guessed it – February.  Now, do you know if your homeowner’s or renters’ insurance policy protects your jewelry? Whether you said “yes” or “no,” you are correct.

Here’s why: Your homeowner’s policy only provides limited coverage on certain high-value items. You may not receive the full value if a loss occurs. Scheduled Personal Property (SPP) insurance, sometimes called a floater, provides additional coverage of valuables – above and beyond what your home insurance provides.

Here are some very important advantages with Scheduled Personal Property plans:

    • Scheduled Personal Property (SPP) offers much broader coverage for your precious items – if you misplace a set of earrings, they are covered; if a diamond falls out of a ring, or a guitar neck breaks, they’re covered.
    • There is no deductible if the covered items are stolen, lost, or damaged.
    • SPP provides a replacement for the actual appraised value of the item.
    • SPP usually costs about one to two percent of the item’s value.

And, Scheduled Personal Property insurance isn’t just for jewelry; you might need the endorsement if you have:

    • Fine art
    • Furs
    • Coin or stamp collections
    • Expensive cameras
    • Firearms
    • Fine silverware
    • Sporting equipment
    • Antiques

And even if you already have gold and jewelry or a rare watch covered with Scheduled Personal Property coverage, you may need a review. Gold and diamond prices have climbed the past few years and you may not have enough protection for their new value.

By nature, many of us are collectors of stuff, and much of that stuff is valuable. Whether you have purchased your priceless items from exotic locations around the globe, inherited them or painstakingly monitored eBay to find them, you no doubt want to protect them.

 

TAKEAWAY: Don’t wait until your precious items are lost, stolen or damaged to find out if you have enough coverage to replace them. Contact CalCas Customer Service today, at 1.800.800.9410 option 3, or www.calcas.com/customer-service.

 

If You “Put a Ring on It”, Insure It

If You “Put a Ring on It”, Insure It

February is the month of love. If you choose to show your love with an expensive piece of jewelry, you’ll want to protect that enduring representation of your love.

One of the best ways is to purchase scheduled personal property (SPP) insurance, sometimes called a floater.

Here’s why: While your renters or homeowners insurance policy covers jewelry for theft or being destroyed in a fire, that coverage is limited. The average Valentine’s Day ring or necklace purchase is about $1,500, the average spend for an engagement ring is $6,000.

Scheduled personal property insurance provides higher coverage for your precious items, like high priced jewelry with coverage above and beyond what home insurance provides.

And, here’s the best part, SPP pays even if that prized piece was accidentally lost or damaged – such as losing a diamond down the sink or toilet. There is no deducible and SPP provides a replacement at the full insured amount. SPP usually costs about one to two percent of the item’s value.

Scheduled personal property isn’t just for jewelry; you might need the endorsement if you have:

  • Fine art
  • Furs
  • Rare coins or money collections
  • Expensive cameras
  • Firearms
  • Fine silverware
  • Stamp collections

And even if you already have gold and jewelry or a rare watch covered with scheduled personal property coverage, you may need a review. Gold and diamond prices have climbed the past few years and you may not have enough protection for their new value.

Don’t wait until your precious items are lost, stolen or damaged to find out if you have enough coverage to replace them; contact a representative today.

 

This article is furnished by California Casualty, providing auto and home insurance to educators, law enforcement officers, firefighters and nurses. Get a quote at 1.866.704.8614 or www.calcas.com.

 

Insurance Tips for Newlyweds

Insurance Tips for Newlyweds

June through September is the peak of wedding season in the United States. Every year  2.1 million couples tie the knot. That breaks down to nearly 6,000 weddings a day!

If you have a special day coming up in the near future, be sure you make all of the appropriate changes to your personal documents, property, and information, so your new bride or groom is represented. These changes also include your insurance.

So, to make it quick and easy here are some insurance tips for newlyweds. Some could even end up saving you some money.

  1. Combine Your Insurance

If you have separate cars with different insurance companies, you’re eligible for discounts by putting both vehicles on the same policy. It also ensures that both drivers are covered no matter which car they use.
PRO TIP: You can save even more by bundling your autos with your home or renters insurance.

  1. Check for a Marriage Discount

Inform your insurance company of your marriage – most auto and home insurance companies offer important discounts for newlyweds. Men under the age of 25 are usually considered high risk drivers. However, once they marry, they often see a big drop in insurance premiums. Lower rates can also apply to those in domestic partnerships.

  1. Increase Homeowner or Renters Coverage

Wedding presents are wonderful! You now have a new set of dishes, expensive new appliances, and other valuable items for your home. Don’t forget, these assets need to be covered. Talk to an insurance advisor to make sure you have enough coverage to protect all the things you own and to increase your liability protection. It’s also a great time to create an inventory of all the things you own to help you purchase the right insurance protection and make filing a claim much easier.

  1. Get Extra Protection for High-Value Items

That beautiful new wedding ring and special gifts like fine art or silverware may need scheduled personal property protection, often called a “floater,” to make sure they are covered for their full value. Most homeowners and renters policies will provide limited coverage for those items. Scheduled personal property coverage will also pay to replace a ring, without a deductible, even if it was misplaced or damaged in the disposal.

Just like marriage, California Casualty is a committed partner in helping with your auto and home insurance needs. One of our advisors can walk you through everything from combining your vehicles to completing a name change.

This article is furnished by California Casualty, providing auto and home insurance to educators, law enforcement officers, firefighters, and nurses. Get a quote at 1.866.704.8614 or www.calcas.com.

 

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