Halloween Costume Ideas for Teachers

Halloween Costume Ideas for Teachers

Don’t let this Halloween be just a bunch of Hocus Pocus in your classroom.

 

Here are some awesome Halloween Costume Ideas for Teachers even the Sanderson sisters would be proud of:

 

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

 

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

 

Smarty Pants

 

Ms. Frizzle

 

Pete the Cat

 

Pumpkin Pie

Where’s Waldo

 

A Bookworm

 

Emojis 🙂

 

EXPO Markers

 

Rainbow Fish

 

Diary of a Wimpy Kid

 

The Hunger Games

 

Alvin & The Chipmunks

 

Fly Guys

 

Nancy Drew

 

The Incredibles

 

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

 

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

 

Bob Ross

 

The Wizard of Oz

 

Cat in the Hat

 

Toy Story

Grouchy Ladybug

 

The Seven Dwarfs

 

The Grammar Police

 

Rock, Paper, Scissors

 

Play-Doh

 

Monsters Inc.

 

Professor Snape

 

And of course, our favorite, The Sanderson Sisters

“We put a spell on you…… Now you have to go check out our Pinterest Page”

Our Pinterest board “Halloween Costumes for Teachers – 2019”  has all kinds of other costume ideas, so be sure to check it out! While you’re there, don’t forget to give us a follow at California Casualty to stay up to date on every new costume we discover! Scan our Pincode with your Pinterest camera to follow:

 

 

This article is furnished by California Casualty, providing auto and home insurance to educators, law enforcement officers, firefighters, and nurses. California Casualty does not own any of the photos in this post, all are sources by to their original owners. Get a quote at 1.866.704.8614 or www.calcas.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Generator Safety Tips and Hacks if Power Goes Out

Generator Safety Tips and Hacks if Power Goes Out

California utility companies are taking drastic steps to prevent wildfires by cutting power to up to one million households. Downed power lines or sparks during high winds and red flag fire warnings have been blamed for starting previous fires. The outages could last for days, depending on the fire threat. generator safety tips

While the blackouts may reduce fire danger, losing power can be frustrating and even life-threatening. Utility companies are urging customers to have an emergency supply kit, keep automobiles with a full tank of gas (in case gas stations in the area are without power), and have an emergency plan if someone depends on electricity for medical needs. It’s important to know how to manually open up garage doors and community gates if the power is out.

Here are some hacks that can make weathering a lack of electricity a little easier:

  1. Strap a headlamp facing into to a clear plastic jug filled with water to light an entire room.
  2. Keep a bag of stuffed animals, games and toys that don’t require electricity to occupy and entertain children.
  3. Turn cell phones off or to airplane mode to extend the battery life and have extra power packs or solar chargers.
  4. Fill your washing machine with ice to make a great cooler with a drain.
  5. Have a propane or briquette grill or camp stove with fuel for cooking (never use it indoors and make sure to have extra fuel or bags of briquettes).
  6. Store milk jugs with frozen water in your freezer to be used to keep food cold and for drinking water when the ice melts.
  7. Stock up on candles, or make your own from your kitchen.
  8. Use boxes of baby wipes if showers don’t work.
  9. Consider installing or buying a standby generator.

Portable generators can power heaters, water pumps and refrigerators, but while it can light your home and make life a little more comfortable, using a portable generator can also be dangerous.

Whether you have used it once or a hundred times, it’s good to know these generator safety tips to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning and fires:

  • Never use a generator inside your home or enclosed areas like a garage – fatal fumes from the engine can build up inside.
  • Keep it away from open windows, vents and doors to keep dangerous fumes from entering your home.
  • Install battery operated carbon monoxide detectors to warn if the exhaust is seeping into your home or shelter.
  • Avoid fires: gasoline and natural gas generators create a lot of heat and can cause nearby combustibles to burn; they also need to be cooled for a few minutes before adding more fuel.
  • Never plug the generator directly into a home’s outlets – it can cause a dangerous “back-feed” on the power grid that can harm utility workers and others working on or repairing power lines.
  • Avoid using generators that are wet or in puddles because they can cause electrocution.
  • Only use heavy-duty electrical cords with portable generators that are rated for outdoor use, and make sure they are uncoiled.

It’s also a good idea to have flashlights or lanterns (with extra batteries) available when there is a power outage. You should also have and emergency kit that contains enough canned food and water to keep your family fed and hydrated for up to a week. This includes extra blankets and warm clothes, and a battery operated or crank radio to keep you up to date on emergency response and repairs.

California Casualty cares about your safety. We have numerous home safety information links available at www.calcas.com/resources.

 

For more information visit:

https://bit.ly/2VrmlZL

https://bit.ly/33d8CIs

https://bit.ly/2MwSkU6

 

This article is furnished by California Casualty, providing auto and home insurance to educators, law enforcement officers, firefighters, and nurses. Get a quote at 1.866.704.8614 or www.calcas.com.

It’s An Honor To Partner With Heroes

Working alongside you is extremely rewarding for all of us here at California Casualty.  Given the chance, we are thrilled to tout the benefits of membership to your organizations, donate to your schools, surprise you with our giving program awards, and take part in ceremonies recognizing all that you do.

Partner Relations members Lisa Almeida, Jana Charles, Inez Morales, Norma Alfaro and Christy Forward at CTA Presidents Conference

The Partner Relations California team members had the opportunity to connect with CTA presidents and greet longtime friends as they attended and hosted events for the CTA Presidents Conference.  In support of our partnership with CTA, it was the team’s goal to make a difference for CTA leaders and promote the value CTA membership provides.

“It’s an honor for us to be able to celebrate and recognize the incredible dedication our chapter leaders give to their association members,” said California Casualty AVP Lisa Almeida.

Attendees received fun giveaways, with one lucky participant winning a VIP trip to a San Francisco Giants baseball game and another winning two 3-day passes to Disneyland.

California Casualty’s Partner Relations members Jeff Meyers and Roxanne Dean had an exciting opportunity to share the Outward Mindset program – one of our company’s newest initiatives to improve communication with fellow employees and our customers – with the Member Services Staff of the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA).

Introduced by a member of the California Casualty Advisory Board, Outward Mindset training is presented to all employees in our company, from Executives to Sales, Service, Underwriting and Claims. The premise is that by getting past “out of the box” thinking, we can better serve our customers while enhancing working relationships throughout all levels of our company.

ACSA Member Benefits consultants were interested in learning how California Casualty uses the program to improve our effectiveness with partners, such as ACSA.

“From the first time I went through this workshop, I fell in love with the fundamental principles involved,” said Jeff. These principles are powerful for our work, and helping the groups that we work with.”

California Casualty has been a longtime partner with ACSA, providing the auto and home insurance program as well as engagement tools to encourage membership. “Thank you for sharing the importance of an outward mindset to engage members,” an ACSA member wrote.

School Lounge Makeover winner Mary (second from left) with California Casualty’s Stephanie Whitmore and NSEA representatives

To round out our educator community efforts in this issue of Connection, let us introduce you to our latest School Lounge Makeover winner. Mary G., an English teacher and the librarian at Palmer Public School in Palmer, Nebraska, was thrilled that the staff will finally have a place to relax and rejuvenate throughout the school day. We will highlight the revitalized lounge (which is being designed now) in the next edition of Connection.

And, 18 years after the terrible 9/11 attacks, California Casualty joined educators, law enforcement officers, firefighters, EMTs and the general public at 11 memorial stair climbs, remembering those who died while saving others. From Maryland to Missouri and Colorado to California, our employees climbed and supported other climbers with water, snacks, and encouragement. In partnership with the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, California Casualty is a proud sponsor of the climbs and donates to the NFFF survivor’s fund.

“This experience was emotional and moving,” said Field Marketing Manager Katelyn Kassel. “The time and effort put into coordinating the events and getting all of the firefighters to come out is a true testament to how much these men and women love what they do. I love our company and what we stand for, and how we are able to protect our first responders,” she added.

Left: Sandra Clemmons-Butler and Jackie Jones at the National Capital Region 9/11 Climb, Washington, D.C.; Right: Debbie Harris and Lorelei Seip at the Yellow Springs, OH 9/11 Stair Climb; Bottom: the California Casualty 9/11 Stair Climb team at Red Rocks, CO.

You can see an inspirational video of our participation at the Red Rocks, Colorado stair climb at our LinkedIn page.

 

TAKEAWAY: Follow the many ways California Casualty celebrates all that you do at our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/CaliforniaCasualty.

Auto Insurance Does More Than Fix Your Car

Auto Insurance Does More Than Fix Your Car

It also protects your assets… if you have the right amount of coverage. In today’s world, having the right amount of auto insurance is imperative. The costs to repair vehicles are increasing, and many times accidents involve lawsuits.

If you do not have high enough liability limits and an accident victim chooses to pursue greater compensation for their injuries, your financial assets – such as your home, your savings, future earnings and even your retirement – are at risk. One serious crash could result in some serious financial distress, even bankruptcy. (Please read that again.)

How is that?

Well, your auto insurance is made up of the coverage limits you choose: Bodily Injury Liability (BI), Property Damage Liability (PD) and Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury (UM).

The minimum liability insurance required varies by state, but generally, it looks something like this:

  • $25,000 bodily injury liability per person
  • $50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
  • $25,000 property damage liability per accident

 

That means if the insured driver is at-fault in a crash, their insurance would pay up to $25,000 to each person in the other vehicle(s) for injuries – up to a total of $50,000, and pay up to $25,000 for the damage caused to the other vehicle(s), public property, etc.

That might sound like enough, but considering the high costs of medical care, the amount someone might suffer in lost wages, and that the average vehicle now retails for almost $40,000, the at-fault driver could pay out-of-pocket tens of thousands of dollars (or more) above what their insurance would cover.

The Insurance Information Institute recommends each person carry at least $100,000 bodily injury protection per person, $300,000 bodily injury protection per accident, and $50,000 for property damage. If you have a lot of assets (a home, investments, vacation property) and a higher earning potential, you should buy even more protection ($250,000, $500,000, $100,000).

Don’t forget uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage (UM). It’s estimated that one out of eight drivers has no insurance, with many others carrying minimal coverage. You’ll want higher limits to pay for any injuries and damage to your vehicle if you are hit by one of these drivers.

Insurance companies urge everyone to purchase as much liability insurance as they can afford, and we are no different.

As your insurance partner, California Casualty takes seriously our obligation to inform you about important insurance gaps, and to offer higher limits (that cost very little for the protection they provide).

TAKEAWAY:

Call one of our customer care representatives at 1.800.800.9410, option 3 to review your current policy limits and discuss your coverage amount options.

Your Classy Chassis Needs Special Coverage

Your Classy Chassis Needs Special Coverage

If you love the roar of a muscle car or the gleaming chrome of a restored classic – and have made your passion for owning one a reality – these important insurance facts pertain to you.

As you know, collectible vehicles are an investment. Some are now selling for hundreds of thousands of dollars. If something were to happen to your beloved ’57 T-bird convertible, ’69 Camaro Z28, or ’55 Mercedes 300SL Gullwing, you need full replacement value insurance coverage.

And the insurance you have on your every day, commuter vehicle doesn’t offer that. A typical auto insurance policy is based on actual cash value and depreciation, so the older your vehicle is, the less it is worth.

Some people don’t insure their collector vehicles because they store them or drive them so seldom, but that could be a big mistake.

Classic car auto insurance pays the agreed value if the vehicle is damaged in a fire, flood or during transportation, or if it is stolen. It also covers the higher cost of repairs if someone scratches the paint or chrome, or steals a specialty part.

It’s true. Classic car insurance protects the vehicle for the full agreed value, meaning it covers these desirable cars and trucks for their increased worth.

Classic auto policies offer the same coverage options as standard insurance – liability, collision, comprehensive, and medical pay – while also protecting the vehicle’s true worth.

Here’s the best part, classic auto insurance usually costs less than standard auto insurance because classic and collector vehicles are normally driven less, are kept garaged, and owners typically maintain them better; therefore, they are considered a better risk.

Classic car policies do come with restrictions:

  • The vehicle must be stored in a locked, safe garage or storage facility
  • The insured vehicle is unique or at least 15 years old
  • It is not used as a regular commute vehicle
  • All drivers have a clean driving record

California Casualty’s Agency Services division offers insurance for collectible, classic, antique and exotic vehicles with:

  • Protection for the full agreed value
  • Adjustable deductibles
  • Towing
  • Coverage for lost or stolen parts
  • Mileage plans

There are many choices to insure your classic vehicle. Our partner for classic car insurance is Condon Skelly. Unlike most classic insurance providers, Condon Skelly does not limit mileage or require seasonal coverage, while still offering competitive rates.

 

TAKEAWAY:

Contact one of California Casualty’s Agency Services advisors today to arrange insurance for your classic or collectible car at 1.877.421.8348 or visit www.calcas.com/classic-car-insurance

 

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