Spring is here! And so are spring storms, but spring showers don’t just bring flowers, they can also bring more water than what your yard can hold. And this standing water around your house can cause water damage to your home- costing you more than you think.

By definition, standing water is a body of water that does not move or sink into the ground. It can be caused by a number of factors: heavy rain, over-watering, poorly draining soil, improper grading, incorrect landscaping, low areas in your yard, and even water line leaks or bursts.

If you have standing water in your yard for multiple days, it can cause serious damage to your home. Not only will it be an eyesore that can ruin your grass and draw unwanted bugs, but stagnant water on the side of your home can also seep into small cracks or pores in your home’s foundation and get into your crawl space or basement, which can lead to water damage & more.

Here’s why you should address the standing water near your home now, and how you can prevent it from happening in the future. 

 

Standing Water Can…

Ruin your basement. Water can cause cracks in your home’s foundation. This is how water enters your basement or your crawl space. Once inside it can create a musty odor and add dampness that will completely ruin flooring, drywall, furniture, electronics, etc. 

Produce mold & mildew. High levels of condensation and humidity inside of your basement or crawl space create an environment for mold and mildew to thrive. This could not only affect your home, but it could also cause major health issues for you and your family.

Breakdown your home’s foundation. Over time, standing water that has made its way into your cement foundation will start to cause shifting and bowing of your structure. This is the beginning of the breakdown of your home’s foundation. If not taken care of- doors will no longer close, floorboards will start to squeak, steel beams may have to be inserted, and it could even lead to structural collapse. 

Cost you thousands of dollars in repairs. A homeowner spends over $3,000 on average to repair damages to their home and property caused by water. Preventive maintenance and early detection are key to helping you save your home and your wallet.

But that’s not all, standing water can also draw unwanted pests: mosquitoes, roaches, termites, ants, silverfish, and other pests thrive in moist environments. They will seek damp areas and make your home their home if you don’t address the issue quickly.

Here’s how you can prevent standing water from getting into your home this spring.

 

How to Prevent Standing Water 

1. Check for Proper Roof Drainage

Make sure every drop of rain will drain off of your roof correctly- starting at your gutters. Make sure they are free of leaves and sticks and that you have an attached downspout that is also clear of debris. It is also important to make sure your downspout has a downspout extension that will move water away from the foundation of your home.

 

2. Monitor Your Sprinkler Usage

If you see standing water, make sure to check that your sprinklers are not overwatering your lawn. First, check to make sure the sprinkler heads are functioning properly and not broken. If there is no issue, you will likely just need to reset your sprinklers to run at a less-frequent timespan. After resetting, if you are still seeing patches of barren or muddy lawn, you may have a leaky valve. Valves are responsible for distributing the water throughout the entire system, and if damaged they will need to be replaced right away.

 

3. Make Sure Your Yard is Correctly Graded

Grading, also referred to as lawn leveling, is the process of leveling your lawn to allow for the proper drainage of water. If you have water that is pooling around your foundation or your house is sitting on a low level, you may need to look into re-leveling your yard. Grading involves the moving of topsoil onto the yard. You will then even out the low spots with the soil and form a downward slope (around 2%) from your home’s foundation. Leveling is an intricate process, and if your yard needs re-leveled, you may need to hire a professional. 

 

4. Aerate Your Lawn

Aerating your yard means to perforate the soil with holes (4 – 6 inches deep) to allow water, air, and other nutrients to better absorb into the soil. Not only will aeration lead to a greener, healthier lawn, but it will also alleviate soil compaction and allow water to better absorb during rainstorms. The best time to aerate your lawn is during spring and fall. 

 

5. Mind Your Landscaping

Improper landscaping can cause water to sit at the base of your home’s foundation and ultimately make it into your home.  When landscaping, avoid making any changes that will block drains or downspouts. Make sure that all of your landscaping slopes downward to create runoff and that all downspout extensions or drainage systems extend beyond your planting beds leading the water away and far from your foundation.

 

6. Install a Drainage System

If you are constantly struggling with standing water in an area of your yard, it may be best to look into installing a yard drain. Yard drains act like shower drains. They prevent flooding and move the water away from your yard through hidden pipes to a dry well.  The dry well will then collect the water underground and slowly percolate to the soil around it

Standing water is a serious, yet largely overlooked, issue that can have serious consequences. If water has been in your yard for multiple days and won’t drain, don’t neglect it. Look for the cause of your problem or reach out to a professional. Acting today will save you time, money, and headache tomorrow.

 

This article is furnished by California Casualty, providing auto and home insurance to educators, law enforcement officers, firefighters, and nurses. Get a quote at 1.866.704.8614 or www.calcas.com.

California Casualty
Latest posts by California Casualty (see all)
California Casualty

Pin It on Pinterest